The Standards

The following principles and criteria for ICT development as a part of Euro Velo network were taken from “Euro Velo, the European cycle route network; Guidelines for implementation”, March 2000, Sustrans Ltd. These criteria have been considered when the partnerts of the StrategIC project chose the physical backbone of the Iron Curtain Trail in the Balkans.

ICT criteria of Michael Cramer also have been considered, but counted as of secondary importance to the Euro Velo ones.

  • keep as close as possible to the former and physical borders
  • use paths that are comfortable to ride on
  • avoid frequent altitude variations and high traffic
  • cross the Iron Curtain borders as frequent as possible
  • include historical remains of the Iron Curtain

1. Guiding principles for cycle route development

Safety
A route that minimizes dangers for cyclists, pedestrians and other users and gives a feeling of security.

Coherence
A continuous route with a distinct and identifiable Euro Velo character, integrated with local roads and cycle paths.

Directness
A route that avoids unnecessary detours, although it may detour to visit special landscapes or sites of interest

Attractiveness
A route that complements and enhances its environment in such a way that cycling is attractive

Comfort
A route that enables a comfortable flow of cycle traffic and is easy to use.

2. Criteria for Euro Velo route selection

Within the Euro Velo network the following criteria should assist in selection of the ideal Euro Velo route. It should:

  • Connect towns, pass through town centres and connect to important railway stations
  • Join together existing long distance cycle routes and utilise existing stretches of other cycle routes
  • Be able to stimulate physical activity, environmental awareness and international contact throughout Europe
  • While being reasonably direct, pass through as many countries as possible
  • Incorporate especially attractive cycling areas
  • Avoid uninteresting or monotonous stretches wherever possible

In line with the five guiding principles a Euro Velo route should also:

  • Be consistent in terms of user safety
  • Have consistent surfacing and avoid frequent changes between materials
  • Plan for safety, speed and comfort standards acceptable for cyclists with fully laden cycles and cycles of different types
  • Be adequately signed to guide visiting tourists
  • Have accommodation and refreshment facilities available at regular intervals
  • Guarantee a memorable cycling experience wherever possible
  • Be accompanied by up to date and reliable information aimed at visitors, as well as local users, and including information on local laws and customs.

3. Basic technical criteria for Euro Velo

The two basic technical issues for Euro Velo routes are safety and consistency. Euro Velo has already put in place some basic technical criteria. These are:

  • Shared on-road routes should normally carry less than 1000 vehicles per day and only in exceptional circumstances more than 3000 vehicles per day
  • Cycle lanes beside the highway should not be located alongside roads carrying more than 10 000 vehicles per day. In exceptional circumstances they may be co-located for up to 2 km
  • Sections of route defined as “traffic free” may carry up to 50 vehicles per day
  • Traffic free route sections should be wide enough for two cyclists to cycle side-by-side most of the time, with a desired standard allowing two pairs of cyclists to meet and pass safely. Variable widths are acceptable along a route
  • Gradients of more than 6% should be avoided wherever possible, although on mountain sections the maximum gradient may be 10 % or greater
  • Routes should generally be open all year and in all weathers, although in the far north or in high mountain areas this may not always be possible
  • Alternatives should be considered for sections of route very heavily used by other types of non-motorised traffic (walkers, horse-riders, etc.); the priority is to minimize possible conflicts
  • The surface of routes should be sealed (e.g. asphalt), or of similar good quality, for at least 80 % of the distance in any jurisdiction; this is particularly important on hills. The surface should be suitable for use by all types of cycle. The local climate should influence the weight given to this criterion
  • If possible refreshment should be available every 30 km, accomodation every 50 km and connection to long distance public transport every 150 km
  • The route should be aesthetically pleasing in terms of its location and design

Принципите и критериите за развитието на велосипедния маршрут „Пътя на Желязната завеса” изброени тук, са взаимствани от изданието Euro Velo, the European cycle route network; Guidelines for implementation”, March 2000, Sustrans Ltd. Тези критерии са водещи за избора на трасе по Желязната завеса от партньорите в проект StrategIC.

The following principles and criteria for ICT development as a part of Euro Velo network were taken from “Euro Velo, the European cycle route network; Guidelines for implementation”, March 2000, Sustrans Ltd. These criteria have been considered when the partnerts of the StrategIC project chose the physical backbone of the Iron Curtain Trail in the Balkans.

ICT criteria of Michael Cramer also have been considered, but counted as of secondary importance to the Euro Velo ones.

  • keep as close as possible to the former and physical borders
  • use paths that are comfortable to ride on
  • avoid frequent altitude variations and high traffic
  • cross the Iron Curtain borders as frequent as possible
  • include historical remains of the Iron Curtain

1. Guiding principles for cycle route development

Safety
A route that minimizes dangers for cyclists, pedestrians and other users and gives a feeling of security.

Coherence
A continuous route with a distinct and identifiable Euro Velo character, integrated with local roads and cycle paths.

Directness
A route that avoids unnecessary detours, although it may detour to visit special landscapes or sites of interest

Attractiveness
A route that complements and enhances its environment in such a way that cycling is attractive

Comfort
A route that enables a comfortable flow of cycle traffic and is easy to use.

2. Criteria for Euro Velo route selection

Within the Euro Velo network the following criteria should assist in selection of the ideal Euro Velo route. It should:

  • Connect towns, pass through town centres and connect to important railway stations
  • Join together existing long distance cycle routes and utilise existing stretches of other cycle routes
  • Be able to stimulate physical activity, environmental awareness and international contact throughout Europe
  • While being reasonably direct, pass through as many countries as possible
  • Incorporate especially attractive cycling areas
  • Avoid uninteresting or monotonous stretches wherever possible

In line with the five guiding principles a Euro Velo route should also:

  • Be consistent in terms of user safety
  • Have consistent surfacing and avoid frequent changes between materials
  • Plan for safety, speed and comfort standards acceptable for cyclists with fully laden cycles and cycles of different types
  • Be adequately signed to guide visiting tourists
  • Have accommodation and refreshment facilities available at regular intervals
  • Guarantee a memorable cycling experience wherever possible
  • Be accompanied by up to date and reliable information aimed at visitors, as well as local users, and including information on local laws and customs.

3. Basic technical criteria for Euro Velo

The two basic technical issues for Euro Velo routes are safety and consistency. Euro Velo has already put in place some basic technical criteria. These are:

  • Shared on-road routes should normally carry less than 1000 vehicles per day and only in exceptional circumstances more than 3000 vehicles per day
  • Cycle lanes beside the highway should not be located alongside roads carrying more than 10 000 vehicles per day. In exceptional circumstances they may be co-located for up to 2 km
  • Sections of route defined as “traffic free” may carry up to 50 vehicles per day
  • Traffic free route sections should be wide enough for two cyclists to cycle side-by-side most of the time, with a desired standard allowing two pairs of cyclists to meet and pass safely. Variable widths are acceptable along a route
  • Gradients of more than 6% should be avoided wherever possible, although on mountain sections the maximum gradient may be 10 % or greater
  • Routes should generally be open all year and in all weathers, although in the far north or in high mountain areas this may not always be possible
  • Alternatives should be considered for sections of route very heavily used by other types of non-motorised traffic (walkers, horse-riders, etc.); the priority is to minimize possible conflicts
  • The surface of routes should be sealed (e.g. asphalt), or of similar good quality, for at least 80 % of the distance in any jurisdiction; this is particularly important on hills. The surface should be suitable for use by all types of cycle. The local climate should influence the weight given to this criterion
  • If possible refreshment should be available every 30 km, accomodation every 50 km and connection to long distance public transport every 150 km
  • The route should be aesthetically pleasing in terms of its location and design